On November 5 and 6, 2019, FERC staff held a two-day workshop at its headquarters in Washington, DC on technologies that increase the capacity, efficiency, or reliability of transmission facilities.  Panelists and FERC staff discussed technologies that are currently used in transmission planning and operations, challenges associated with the deployment of grid-enhancing technologies, and regulatory actions that might promote increased adoption of these technologies going forward. A formal notice requesting written comments will soon be issued. 
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On October 17, 2019, FERC issued two separate orders accepting in part PJM Interconnection L.L.C.’s (“PJM”), and Southwest Power Pool, Inc.’s (“SPP”) proposals to comply with FERC’s orders addressing energy storage resources’ (“ESR”) participation in Regional Transmission Organization (“RTO”)-operated markets, subject to further compliance (see February 20, 2018 edition of the WER; April 10, 2019 edition of the WER; and May 22, 2019 edition of the WER for more background and context on Order No. 841). SPP’s and PJM’s ESR participation proposals are the first to be accepted by FERC, which found that the RTOs generally complied with Order No. 841 by enabling ESRs to provide all services they are technically capable of providing, to be compensated for those services in the same manner as other resources, and by recognizing ESRs’ unique physical and operational characteristics. However, FERC initiated further proceedings to require both RTOs to include the minimum run-time requirements applicable to ESRs and other generation resources in their Tariffs, and initiated an investigation into whether PJM’s application of minimum run-time requirements to ESRs participating in its capacity markets is just and reasonable. FERC also directed SPP and PJM to take further action, requiring both RTOs to submit compliance filings within 60 days that, as one example, address the basic metering and accounting practices applicable to ESRs. Commissioner McNamee issued separate opinions concurring with both orders.
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On October 17, 2019, FERC denied a complaint filed in June 2019 by Nevada Hydro Company, Inc. (“Nevada Hydro”) alleging that the California Independent System Operator Corporation (“CAISO”) failed to follow its Tariff requirements in studying the Lake Elsinore Advanced Pumped Storage Project (“LEAPS”) as a transmission facility in CAISO’s 2018-2019 transmission planning process. FERC concluded that Nevada Hydro failed to demonstrate that CAISO violated its Tariff in studying LEAPS as a proposed reliability-driven transmission solution and as a proposed economic transmission project. Rather, FERC accepted CAISO’s conclusion that it could identify no reliability need for LEAPS, and that the project’s economic benefits are far outweighed by its costs. FERC’s October 17 order also explained that it found no evidence that CAISO’s treatment of LEAPS was biased by a predetermined conclusion that LEAPS is a generation asset or that storage cannot qualify as transmission. FERC went on to note that a project’s ability to provide transmission benefits does not equate to a transmission need, nor does it guarantee eligibility to recover costs through transmission rates.
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On August 22, 2019, FERC dismissed as premature Alternative Transmission Inc.’s (“ATI”) petition for declaratory order (“Petition”) asking FERC to declare that ATI’s alternative transmission facilities and services are subject to FERC’s jurisdiction and that ATI, as the owner and operator of the facilities, will be a public utility under the Federal Power Act (“FPA”).
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