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On May 16, 2019, FERC issued four orders on related complaints against the Midcontinent Independent System Operator, Inc. (“MISO”) by Tilton Energy LLC (“Tilton”), American Municipal Power, Inc. (“AMP”), and Dynegy Marketing and Trade, LLC/Illinois Power Marketing Company (“Dynegy Companies” or “Dynegy”), as well as a complaint against PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. (“PJM”) by AMP and the Northern Illinois Municipal Power Agency (“NIMPA”).  The complaints alleged that MISO’s and PJM’s assessment of congestion and other costs for resources physically located in MISO but pseudo-tied into PJM violated MISO’s and PJM’s Tariffs by imposing duplicative charges.  The complaints also alleged that MISO and PJM subjected the complainants to unjust and unreasonable duplicative congestion charges.  FERC’s orders denied arguments that MISO’s and PJM’s assessment of congestion and other charges violated their respective Tariffs, but found that MISO and PJM may have assessed duplicative congestion charges prior to FERC’s acceptance of revisions to the MISO-PJM Joint Operating Agreement (“JOA”) to address such charges beginning in July 2018.  After consolidating the proceedings, FERC’s orders established hearing and settlement procedures to determine appropriate refunds.
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On May 3, 2018, FERC accepted revisions proposed by PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. (“PJM”) to its Open Access Transmission Tariff, Amended and Restated Operating Agreement, and Reliability Assurance Agreement Among Load Serving Entities in the PJM Region, to reflect load reductions from Summer-period Demand Response resources in load forecasts for PJM’s capacity market (“Peak Shaving Adjustment”).
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On May 6, 2019, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (“Oregon DEQ”) denied a water quality certification under section 401 of the Clean Water Act (“CWA”) for the proposed Jordan Cove liquefied natural gas (“LNG”) export terminal and its feeder pipeline, the Pacific Connector, to be located on Oregon’s southern coast.
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Last week, the U.S. Department of Energy (“DOE”) released an update (“2018 Update”) to its 2017 U.S. Hydropower Market Report (“2017 Report”).  The 2018 Update provides a status report on the U.S. hydropower industry as of the end of 2018, and includes publicly available data and information on existing U.S. hydropower facilities, including trends on capacity, generation, and new investment.
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On April 23, 2019 FERC granted in part and denied in part a rehearing request (“Rehearing Order”) filed by American Municipal Power Inc. (“AMP”) of FERC’s February 5, 2018 order (“February 5 Order”) accepting PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.’s (“PJM”) revisions to amend its Open Access Transmission Tariff (“Tariff”) and Amended and Restated Operating Agreement (“Operating Agreement”) to improve the process for adding a pseudo-tied resource into the PJM region.  As part of this process, PJM proposed to incorporate two pro forma pseudo-tie agreements and a pro forma system modification reimbursement agreement (“Reimbursement Agreement”).  In the Rehearing Order, FERC granted AMP’s request on rehearing that the indemnification provisions of the Reimbursement Agreement should be consistent with related provisions in the pro forma pseudo-tie agreements.  FERC denied rehearing with respect to the compensation provision and the suspension and termination provisions in the pro forma pseudo-tie agreements.
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On April 18, 2019, FERC issued Order No. 858, revising its regulations to conform with the America’s Water Infrastructure Act (“AWIA”), which added sections 34 and 35 to the Federal Power Act (“FPA”) authorizing FERC to issue or amend licenses for: (1) qualifying facilities at an existing nonpowered dams (section 34); and (2) closed-loop pumped storage projects (section 35).  In conformance with AWIA, Order No. 858 establishes an expedited hydropower licensing process for projects covered by newly-added FPA sections 34 and 35. 
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On April 1, 2019, FERC issued deficiency letters to the six FERC-jurisdictional ISOs and RTOs, asking for additional information about how they intend to comply with the directives of FERC Order No. 841.  The specific ISOs and RTOs are: ISO New England Inc. (“ISO-NE”); Midcontinent Independent System Operator, Inc. (“MISO”); California Independent System Operator Corporation (“CAISO”); New York Independent System Operator, Inc. (“NYISO”); PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. (“PJM”); and Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (“SPP”).  Each grid operator has thirty days to respond to the deficiency letters.
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On Monday, March 25, 2019, ISO New England, Inc. (“ISO-NE”) filed a proposal with FERC for an interim inventoried energy program that would provide incremental compensation to generation resources that store fuel onsite during winter months. ISO-NE’s filing explains that a key contributor to the region’s winter energy security concerns is its reliance on gas deliveries from the interstate pipeline network, which can become constrained during winter cold spells, and that lack of on-site fuel sources during these cold spells can lead to loss of load events.  ISO-NE seeks to reduce this concern by directly compensating generation resources for maintaining “inventoried energy,” defined as “fuel or potential energy that a resource can convert to electric energy at the ISO’s direction.”  The proposal is intended as an interim measure to complement the ISO’s ongoing efforts to develop a long-term, market-based solution to the region’s fuel security challenges.  The ISO believes that the program will contribute to the region’s winter energy security by providing incremental revenue to generation resources that store fuel on-site, reducing the amount of revenue those resources must recover through the capacity market, and decreasing the likelihood that such resources will seek to retire.  However, ISO-NE also clarified that it cannot guarantee that the program will “incent specific resources to take precise actions that improve winter energy security or deter any particular resource that would otherwise be economic from retiring.”
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On March 20, 2019 the Missouri Public Service Commission (“MPSC”) granted a certificate of convenience and necessity (“CCN”) to Grain Belt Express Clean Line LLC (“Grain Belt”) for a $2.35 billion, 780-mile, 600 kV transmission line that is planned to deliver wind-generated electricity from western Kansas to customers in both MISO and PJM. While the MPSC previously denied Grain Belt’s application for a CCN in a 2015 decision that cited burdens to affected landowners, its March 20 order concludes that “the broad economic, environmental, and other benefits of the Project to the entire state of Missouri outweigh the interests of the individual landowners,” whose concerns would be “addressed through carefully considered conditions placed on the CCN.”
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